What a typical Facebook job offer package looks like

techmanga June 27, 2021 0 Comments



What a typical Facebook job offer package looks like


Once you actually get through the Facebook interview gauntlet, you may receivea job offer. Let’s look at an example to see what you can expect.Facebook’s offers are pretty standard: * Base salary * Sign-on * New-Hire EquityThey may also include other components like an annual bonus and an annualstock refresher.They will often roll all these numbers together to describe the offer in termsof “Total Compensation”, which may seem like a big number.Here’s an example taken from a modified version of a real Facebook job offerfrom one of my clients (all numbers are $1,000s). This offer is for $200,000base salary, $400,000 total equity (vesting over four years), and a $50,000sign-on bonus:Component| | Year 1| Year 2| Year 3| Year 4| Total —|—|—|—|—|—|— Base Salary| | 200| 200| 200| 200| 800 Sign-on| | 50| | | | 50 Total Cash| | 250| 200| 200| 200| 850 New-Hire Equity| | 100| 100| 100| 100| 400 Total | | 350| 300| 300| 300| 1,250 Let’s look a little closer at the main components of a Facebook job offer.

Before you get a job offer


Your Facebook recruiter will ask for your salary history, or at least yourcurrent salary if it’s legal where they are. Do not tell them your currentsalary. If you do, the base salary component of your job offer will probablybe slightly above your current salary and it will be challenging to negotiatea substantial increase once they make your job offer.They will also usually ask for your salary expectations. That request willsound something like this:> So what were you hoping for in terms of compensation if you come aboard here> at Facebook?Do not tell them your salary expectations because you will essentially beguessing what they might pay someone with your skillset and experience to dothe job they need done.While they might have a good idea of the value of that job to Facebook’sbusiness, you would only be guessing. You will practically always guess wrongand cost yourself money later on. So just don’t guess.Facebook will hold on tight to these numbers and it can be very, verychallenging to get them to move once they know what they are aiming for. Soavoid sharing that information if at all possible.

Once you receive your job offer from Facebook


Although Facebook is typically only moderately flexible on base salary, Iprefer to begin by negotiating base salary to see how flexible they are in theother components. By pushing on base salary—even knowing they aren’t veryflexible—we give them an opportunity to show where they are the most flexible.They will often respond to a request for a higher base salary by movingmoderately or not at all on base salary, while suggesting a significantlybetter equity or sign-on bonus component.Once they reveal where they’re flexible and how flexible they are, you can usethat information to focus the negotiation on the most flexible components tomaximize your offer.

What to look out for when negotiating a Facebook job offer package


* Facebook will often ask for competing offers—sharing those offers may be beneficial. Many companies ask for competing offers to gather data on competitors or to dissuade the “I have lots of offers” bluff that many candidates use. But when Facebook is competing with companies like Google and Apple for candidates, they will often match competing offers if they’re superior. * Facebook will often respond to a request for higher base salary by slightly improving base salary and significantly improving the equity component. * Facebook is often rigid with respect to the “level” offered. Because they use equity as a primary negotiating lever, they have lots of flexibility within pay bands and therefore rarely change pay bands—or levels—as part of the negotiation.I hired Josh because I didn’t want to leave money on the table. Throughworking with him, I learned about salary ranges and levels and how to write asalary negotiation email.I appreciated Josh’s turnaround time, his clarity of explanations andjustification for what we asked for in the negotiation, and the honesty of hisservices.I negotiated a $10k sign-on bonus and $7k more in base salary. I feel it addsmore credibility to my own worth — and I know I shouldn’t use a number tojustify my self-worth, but it helps :)I’d recommend Josh’s salary negotiation coaching because it’s effective and hedelivers results in an honest way. It was a pleasure working with him and Ihope to do so again!Engineer, FacebookMy lack of experience negotiating and being too biased by my own emotions ledme to Josh.I was negotiating more than one offer and I was overwhelmed when one of therecruiters used high-pressure tactics. In that moment, you can’t believe howhappy I was that Josh was there to back me up. He also helped me learn how tobe concise and direct, which helped me negotiate better.I negotiated an offer with Facebook with an additional $225,000 in equity,meaning I can save more money.Working with Josh went super well! People like Josh are the ones that leave atrace on this world and he certainly left a trace in my life. I hope our pathscross again.Research Scientist, Facebook

What a typical Google job offer package looks like


Once you actually get through the Google interview gauntlet, you may receive ajob offer. Let’s look at an example to see what you can expect.Google’s offers are pretty standard: * Base salary * Sign-on * New-Hire EquityThey may also include other components like a Target Bonus, and they may evenshare an estimated value of other perks that Google employees get.They will often roll all these numbers together to describe the offer in termsof “Total Compensation”, which may seem like a big number.Here’s an example taken from a modified version of a real Google job offerfrom one of my clients (all numbers are $1,000s):Component| | Year 1| Year 2| Year 3| Year 4| Total —|—|—|—|—|—|— Base Salary| | 140| 140| 140| 140| 560 Target Bonus| | 20| 20| 20| 20| 80 Sign-on| | 40| | | | 40 Total Cash| | 200| 160| 160| 160| 680 New-Hire Equity| | 75| 75| 75| 75| 300 Total | | 275| 235| 235| 235| 980 Let’s look a little closer at the main components of a Google job offer.

Before you get a job offer


Your Google recruiter will ask for your salary history, or at least yourcurrent salary if it’s legal where they are. Do not tell them your currentsalary. If you do, the base salary component of your job offer will probablybe slightly above your current salary and it will be challenging to negotiatea substantial increase once they make your job offer.They will also usually ask for your salary expectations. That request willsound something like this:> So what were you hoping for in terms of compensation if you come aboard here> at Google?Do not tell them your salary expectations because you will essentially beguessing what they might pay someone with your skillset and experience to dothe job they need done.While they might have a good idea of the value of that job to Google’sbusiness, you would only be guessing. You will practically always guess wrongand cost yourself money later on. So just don’t guess.Google will hold on tight to these numbers and it can be very, verychallenging to get them to move once they know what they are aiming for. Soavoid sharing that information if at all possible.As a final note on this, I’ve worked with clients whose Google recruiter toldthem they could not move forward with the interview process until my clientshared their salary expectations. Eventually, they did move on despite myclients’ refusal to share this information. So, in my experience, this is abluff.

Once you receive your job offer from Google


Although Google isn’t typically very flexible on base salary, I prefer tobegin by negotiating base salary to see how flexible they are in the othercomponents. By pushing on base salary—even knowing they aren’t veryflexible—we give them an opportunity to show where they are the most flexible.They will often respond to a request for a higher base salary by movingslightly or not at all on base salary, while suggesting a significantly betterequity or sign-on bonus component.Once they reveal where they’re flexible and how flexible they are, you can usethat information to focus the negotiation on the most flexible components tomaximize your offer.

What to look out for when negotiating a Google job offer package


* Google is very sticky once they know their target. If you tell them your salary history (especially current salary) or salary expectations, their offer will likely be very close to either of those numbers and they will not move very much from that starting point. * Google will often respond to a request for higher base salary by slightly improving base salary and significantly improving the equity component. * Google is often rigid with respect to the “level” offered. Because they use equity as a primary negotiating lever, they have lots of flexibility within pay bands and therefore rarely change pay bands—or levels—as part of the negotiation. * Google will often ask for competing offers—sharing those offers may be beneficial. Many companies ask for competing offers to gather data on competitors or to dissuade the “I have lots of offers” bluff that many candidates use. But when Google is competing with companies like Facebook and Apple for candidates, they will often match competing offers if they’re superior.

What a typical Amazon job offer package looks like


Once you actually get through the Amazon interview gauntlet, you may receive ajob offer. Let’s look at an example to see what you can expect.Amazon’s offers are unique, but have three standard components:They will often roll all these numbers together to describe the offer in termsof “Total Compensation” by year, but that can be tricky to understand thanksto some quirks I’ll describe below.Here’s an example taken from a modified version of a real Amazon job offerfrom one of my clients:Component| | Year 1| Year 2| Year 3| Year 4| Total —|—|—|—|—|—|— Base Salary| | $145k| $145k| $145k| $145k| $580k Sign-on| | $30k| $20k| | | $50k Total Cash| | $175k| $165k| $145k| $145k| $630k Equity (RSUs) Vesting| | 5%| 15%| 40%| 40%| 100% Equity (RSUs) | | 2.5| 7.5| 20| 20| 50 Equity (RSUs) Value* | | $5k| $15k| $40k| $40k| $100k Total | | $180k| $180k| $185k| $185k| $730k * Equity (RSUs) Value is computed using a round number of $2,000 per share to make things easyNotice that the Total is pretty consistent through the first four years, butthe sign-on bonus and equity components vary pretty dramatically from year toyear.This is what I was referring to above when I mentioned they incentivize you tostay for a few years. The vast majority of the equity is paid out in yearsthree and four, so there’s a pretty big incentive to stick around.Let’s look a little closer at the main components of an Amazon job offer.As with most job offers, this is the stable, predictable component that youcan use to pay your mortgage or car payment. You can’t know what companyperformance might look like in the future, so it’s hard to estimate how muchof a bonus you’ll get or what your RSUs will be worth when they vest.Amazon tends to pay competitive base salaries up to a point (see below). Ifyou’re wondering whether the salary you’re offered is competitive, paysa.comand levels.fyi are good places to start.

Before you get a job offer


Your Amazon recruiter will often ask for your salary history, or at least yourcurrent salary if it’s legal where they are. Do not tell them your currentsalary.They will also usually ask for your salary expectations. That request willsound something like this:> So what were you hoping for in terms of compensation if you come aboard here> at Amazon?Do not tell them your salary expectations because you will essentially beguessing what they might pay someone with your skillset and experience to dothe job they need done.While they might have a good idea of the value of that job to Amazon’sbusiness, you would only be guessing. You will practically always guess wrongand cost yourself money later on. So just don’t guess.Also, because Amazon’s equity vesting schedule is so unusual, and because theyinclude different-sized Year 1 and Year 2 sign-on bonuses, it can be verydifficult to even describe a “salary number” in those terms.You’re much better off seeing what they offer, spending some time with it tounderstand what your actual pay will look like over the next few years, andnegotiating from there.

Once you receive your job offer from Amazon


The first thing you should do is look to see if you’re at or near the basesalary cap. It’s important to know up front if you can expect a move on basesalary or if you’re really just going to negotiate equity and sign-on bonus.That doesn’t mean you won’t counter on base salary, but it helps to knowwhether you can expect any movement there so you’re not disappointed if theyaren’t flexible on base salary.Once you counter on base salary, they will often adjust the job offer inmultiple dimensions, so it’s important to do the math to figure out what yourannual compensation will be if they adjust base salary, sign-on bonus and/orequity.Be sure that if you ask for and receive more equity that you also try toimprove your sign-on bonus to bridge the Year 1 and Year 2 gaps while you waiton the heavy vesting in Years 3 and 4.

What to look out for when negotiating an Amazon job offer package


* Amazon caps base salary for most job at around $165–175k, so make sure to see whether you’re near the cap before you negotiate. * Amazon has a very unique equity vesting schedule that ramps significantly in Years 3 and 4. * Amazon frequently offers two sign-on bonuses—Year 1 and Year 2—to help bridge the gap during the slow part of the equity vesting ramp. * Do the math for each year’s compensation based on their offer so you can see how your pay will change as sign-on bonuses are paid out and equity vesting ramps up later on.I’ve never negotiated an extra dollar for myself in any job offer or raise,and I had tried a couple times before.Having a third party actually validate my concerns was more helpful than Iexpected. I couldn’t get that from most of my friends and family because theyare either co-workers or people not familiar with the industry.There’s a lot of anxiety and it can feel like there’s deadlines and urgency tomaking decisions and communicating back, even if it’s not necessarily thecase. With Josh, there was a lot of strategic planning around how to timeresponses properly and when to take a phone call versus send an email. Both ofthose things I think worked out to help me get the best outcome.The fact that Josh helped me get an additional $74,000 was amazing. It wasn’tunexpected to get more money, but it was unexpected to get that much moremoney. I definitely would not have been able to get the offer I did withoutJosh’s help.Justin Garrison, Software Development Advocate, AmazonI would highly recommend Josh as a salary negotiation coach because has theknowledge and experience of what it takes to maximize your salary and totalcompensation.I was expecting job offers from Amazon and Tesla, and I wanted to be confidentI got the best offer from each company so I could make the right decision. Iconsidered just handling it myself, but decided I would rather work with anexperienced coach and expert with whom I could discuss all aspects of thepositions and corresponding offers.What a great decision!Approachable, knowledgeable, availableJosh is very approachable and knowledgeable about the entire process and wasable to provide possible next steps that were very accurate. He made himselfavailable for calls and was very quick responding to emails with thorough,specific guidance on what to write or say at each stage in the negotiations.He was there to answer even the smallest of questions.Josh took time to research specific questions related to both positions andthe intricacies of the salary and total compensation discussions for bothcompanies. The offers I got were very different offers, and he took the timeto break them down into components so we could negotiate effectively and do anapples-to-apples comparison so I could make the best decision.A great investmentI would highly recommend Josh as a salary negotiation coach because has theknowledge and experience of what it takes to maximize your salary and totalcompensation. He is also highly approachable and made himself available onvery short notice.Josh added value by making me confident when performing salary negotiationsand showing me how to take the right steps in the process. He was professionaland honest during the entire process.This was a great investment.Jonathan, Tesla Staff Design Engineer

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